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ISSN 1409-6900 | UDK 82+7     Blesok no. 107 | volume  | May 2016



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                     Peer-reviewed journal
Blesok no. 107May 2016
Reviews

THE PLURALITY OF PERSPECTIVES IN LIDIJA DIMKOVSKA’S POETIC WORLD

/5
p. 1
Goce Smilevski

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THE PLURALITY OF PERSPECTIVES IN LIDIJA DIMKOVSKA’S POETIC WORLD

    (On the poetic collection In Black and White by Lidija Dimkovska, published by Ili-Ili, Skopje, 2016)
      
    Translated into English by: Natasha Stojanovska-Ilievska
    The verses which are quoted in the text had previously been translated by Ljubica Arsovska and by Peggy Reed

      
    Lidija Dimkovska’s poetry has always had that specific feature of being remarkably current, and thanks to its universal dimension, it loses not, but retains this feature of currency years after being written and published. This is because Dimkovska captures the essence both when through her verses she speaks of the self and of the most personal, and when she speaks of the Other and the most universal. In her exploration of the world stretched open before the poetic subject, by being faced with the Other and with the relations emerging in these encounters with the Otherness, in the poems of Lidija Dimkovska’s latest poetic collection In Black and White we witness a different perception of the reality, a world identical to the one that we have before our very eyes every day, but this time seen through the vision of the nomadic subject, defined in Rosi Braidotti’s Nomadic Subjects as a subject in a constant process of (self)transformation, as “vertiginous progression toward deconstructing identity; molecularization of the self” (Braidotti, 2002: 27). In this journey through oneself and through the world, moving along the trajectory of the journey of relocation, the poetic subject in Dimkovska’s poems unifies spaces and times, events and people. It is precisely through this molecularization of the self that the poetic subject develops particular sensitivity to those forced to relocation, to dislocation. The poems from In Black and White touch upon some of the most sensitive issues regarding the refugee crisis the world has been facing in recent years, and treat the topic of exile in verse in a subtle, yet, at the same time, fierce manner. Edward Said portrays human beings as being in a kind of a symbiotic relationship with their birthplace, and he describes exile as an “unhealable rift forced between a human being and a native place, between the self and its true home” (Said, 2001: 173). It is in this rift that the life of the uprooted gets shattered, which is why the poetic subject in one of the poems in In Black and White says:
    “You know, you know very






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